Yorkton's Early Story

Yearly Summary

 Pre-Settlement

 1882-1889

 1890-1899

 1900-1909

 1910-1919

 1920-1929

 1930-1939

 1940-1949

 1950-1959

 1960-1969

 1970-1979

 1980-1989

 1990-1999

 2000-2009

 2010-Present

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Yorkton's 125th Anniversary

Gallagher Centre Renovations

 On-Site Photos

Water Plant Expansion

Water Pollution Control Plants

2010 State of Emergency

History and Folklore Summary
1920 - 1929

1920

- The Allen Theatre was built at 17, 3rd Avenue North and opened for business on February 5th.

- Burke School was opened this year.

- In THE YORKTON ENTERPRISE of June 3rd, a citizen signing "Bread Eater" complained in the Letters to the Editor that the price of bread in Yorkton was 12½ cents for a 14 ounce loaf, while in Winnipeg it was 9 cents for a 16 ounce loaf.

1921

- On May 24, Deer Park Golf Course held its official opening.

- March 29th of this year, the Rotary Club of Yorkton held its first luncheon meeting.

- The population of Yorkton was 5,151.

1922

- The Council made a resolution whereby unemployed men who refused to make themselves available for employment would be refused relief.

- Fire completely destroyed the Curling Rink on Agricultural Avenue on March 24th. (Note from the Howard Jackson Papers.)

1923

- Spring floods affected Yorkton in April.

- A.R. Reusch was the man in charge of the local Wheat pool campaign.

- Harry Bronfman purchased the Yaholnitsky Block on Betts Avenue.

- The unveiling of a memorial tablet dedicated to Major C. D. Livingstone took place at the Provincial Court House on November 11, 1923. The tablet was a project of the International Order of the Daughters of the Empire.

- THE YORKTON ENTERPRISE Friday Nov. 23, 1923 published this message:
WHAT WE NEED
What we need in this country today is more common, old-fashioned horse sense and less damn foolishness.
We need more backbone and less wishbone,
We need more honest, sincere, courageous thinking along sane constructive lines and less chasing after rainbows and following false ideals,
We need to check our mad career of lawmaking and law tinkering and make some effort to return to the old-fashioned principles of right and justice,
We need to abolish the mess of red tape in our business government that envelopes us in a fog of doubt and uncertainty, that bewilders and befuddles everybody and gets us nowhere!

1924

- The Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities held a meeting in Regina on March 6, 7 & 8th.

- This year saw the opening of the Hudson Bay Railroad. Yorkton now had north-south, and east-west railway traffic.

1925

- George Headon—six feet two inches tall and 215 pounds-became chief of police at $165.00 per month. He immediately recommended that the curtains be removed from the windows of the Chinese Restaurants.

1926

- The Yorkton Rotary Club established a library in the Patrick Block on Third Avenue.

- This was the last year gas lamps were used on Yorkton's streets.

- The Yorkton Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion was organized with General Alexander Ross as President.

1927

- Chinese restaurant owners still had to apply to Council for a permit to hire white waitresses.

- C.J.G.X. Radio Station was officially opened on August 19th..

1928

- Yorkton was incorporated as a CITY on February 1st.

- J. J. Maloney leader of the Provincial Ku Klux Klan was in town to make a speech.

- York Farmers' Colonization Company Limited of Toronto donated $500.00 to help with the construction of the new hospital. . (The Yorkton Enterprise.)

1929

- Building permits for the City of Yorkton amounted to over $62,000.00

- J.T.M. Anderson, school inspector and leader of the Conservative Party was elected Premier of Saskatchewan.

- A.C. Stewart, who was Mayor from 1927-1929, became an MLA and joined the new Anderson Government.

- The cornerstone of Victoria School was laid on June 25. (Yorkton Enterprise Oct. 6, 1965.)

- The official opening of the Roxy Theatre at #11 on Broadway Street was held on November 5th.

- The new Queen Victoria Hospital was erected on the same grounds at the cottage hospital. ( From EIGHTY YEARS OF CARING by Kathleen Wood.)